Posts from Tom Albin

How Reliable is Your Measurement of Forces to Maneuver Carts?

How Reliable is Your Measurement of Forces to Maneuver Carts?

By Tom Albin | Workplace Ergonomics | November 21st, 2017 | Comments (0)
Effective management of manual cart handling ergonomic programs relies on measuring the forces required to move carts manually. Forces that exceed acceptable levels are more likely to result in injury and may also adversely affect productivity. An accurate, reliable measurement of the force required to manually move carts is essential for the effective use of the Liberty Mutual Tables or any other tools that evaluate the acceptable level of the forces required to move carts. But, how reliable is your measurement of the forces exerted to maneuver carts in your facilities?
Aviation Ergonomics: The Ups and Downs of Manual Cart Handling in the Airline Industry

Aviation Ergonomics: The Ups and Downs of Manual Cart Handling in the Airline Industry

By Tom Albin | Workplace Ergonomics | October 17th, 2017 | Comments (0)
Aircraft manufacturers need to consider the risk of injury in manual material handling tasks. Wheels move all types of things in all types of places. There are some unique situations involving manually handling wheeled objects in aviation, both in manufacturing and in the operation of commercial aircraft. There are risks of overexertion injuries resulting from pushing and pulling when the tasks are not well designed, controlled and managed.
Proactive Ergonomics and Cart Handling in the Automotive Industry

Proactive Ergonomics and Cart Handling in the Automotive Industry

The automotive industry has a long and successful history of employing manual material handling ergonomics programs to reduce the likelihood of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and utilizing proactive ergonomics as a tool for improving both operational efficiencies and product quality. Find out more about proactive ergonomic best practices in implementing new or retrofit industrial ergonomics programs in the automotive industry.
Safe Operating Envelope

Safe Operating Envelope

Just as there are safe operating envelopes for aircraft, there are safe operating envelopes for pushing and pulling carts. Just as for aircraft, the strength and endurance capabilities of the human operator play an important role in determining the safe operating envelopes for carts. Operating forces that stress the operator beyond their limits are outside the safe operating envelope. Consequently, measuring the forces exerted by the cart operator and comparing those forces to known operator limits is the basis for determining a safe operating envelope.
Maintaining Carts for Optimal Push/Pull Forces

Maintaining Carts for Optimal Push/Pull Forces

In North America, limiting the risk of injury while handling carts is commonly done by keeping the operating forces at or below a reference force limit. For example, starting a cart moving shouldn’t require a force more than about 220 newtons (or 50 pounds of force). A good, systematic approach to managing the safety of pushing and pulling carts must ensure that the operating force is within the recommended limits to begin with and then remains there throughout the cart’s working life. Consequently, a manual cart safety program must do more than an initial test of cart operating forces or documenting a purchasing specification for cart push pull forces. Routinely testing carts to ensure that the operating forces are maintained within safe limits is an essential part of managing cart safety. Not to do so means that an operators’ risk exposure is unknown and uncontrolled.

-- see more posts --

Superior caster design to support workplace ergonomics.

Pushed, pulled or driven through your workplace, Darcor casters are also silent partners, dramatically reducing noise and noise-related injury as they improve mobility.

dummyGuide to Workplace Ergonomics DOWNLOAD
©2015 Copyright. All rights reserved. | Terms of use | Privacy Statement